Welcoming Back Mr. Stupp

Back to Article
Back to Article

Welcoming Back Mr. Stupp

Sarah Clark, Senior Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






With the new school year having already started, several new teachers have been hired to instruct at Cuba-Rushford. One in particular is not exactly a “new teacher,” but he has come back to teach English once more. Mr. Stupp, who left to instruct at Alfred State has come back to teach tenth grade English to replace Mrs. Botens. He is from Seneca Falls and he attended Saint Bonaventure for his bachelors and masters degree. He then went to West Virginia University for his PhD. He enjoys playing guitar, as he has also played in various different bands. He also likes woodworking, growing vegetables and all in all being outside. He spent a couple of his summers at an organic farm and really enjoyed that.

If Mr. Stupp was given a million dollars, he would most likely buy his wife a new van and take his family on a nice two week vacation. He would also see if he could build something such as a youth center that kids could go to after school and do homework or play video games if they wanted to, especially if they did not have a console or anything like that at home. If he could meet two people from history, he would choose to meet Hitler and Hunter Thompson. He would choose to meet Hitler solely on the fact that he would like to ask “why,” just to see what would be said. He would like to meet Hunter Thompson because he was a writer for Rolling Stone whom he enjoyed.

In high school, Mr. Stupp liked the social aspects such as seeing his friends and going to concerts. He also liked his teachers and the school system he was in. He disliked the fact that being in a small town, he “felt visible all the time.” He also didn’t like that there was virtually no freedom to pursue what he was interested in high school, as there was a set curriculum. Mr. Stupp went to college to become a journalist but a journalist job is hard to come by. He always enjoyed English and “did not like to be told what to think.” In English, there is room for interpretation. Plus, he always really liked his English teachers so he decided to instruct an English class. He did not have a set moment, as some people do, where he decided to be a teacher. He just “kind of fell into it” and “felt it was something [he] was meant to be good at.” When he first taught at Cuba-Rushford he had some difficulties because his first year here was hectic. He did not have enough credits to teach a college level class to satisfy the needs of New York State (even with a PhD), so he had to take four online courses and earn a total of 21 credits in one year. He also got in a bad car accident and ended up with a broken leg and sternum. Within the same year, he and his wife had their first child. Mr. Stupp came back to Cuba-Rushford after teaching at Alfred State because it did not fulfill what he saw his purpose as. He did not “like the culture there,” he felt overworked and the quality of students were what he saw as “beneath what he was used to at the high school level.” He saw that there was another opening at Cuba-Rushford and he is glad he came back. He enjoys being a teacher because he feels that he is helping people and he enjoys working with young people because they are usually more “open-minded” than others. If he could not be a teacher, he would think about becoming a counselor because he likes to talk to others and be helpful.

The topic that Mr. Stupp has liked teaching the most is philosophy, mostly due to the fact that it covers large ideas and he is “interested to see where people can go with those.” He also feels that too much of this conversation can be draining, yet “in today’s society there is not enough of it.” In fact, he likes philosophy so much that if he could chose another main topic to teach, he would choose just that. If not, he would decide on something in science because “it’s all about discovery.”

As the interview concluded, Mr. Stupp had one piece of advice that he wishes to pass onto his students which is to “live your life consciously and on purpose.” He believes that people need to stop falling into bad habits and leave situations that make them unhappy. People should not just coast through life on “autopilot.” Ultimately, he believes that “we, as people, need to start paying more attention to the way we live the present, stop focusing on the past, and stop being so afraid of something that hasn’t even happened yet.”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email